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The Perfect Immersion Blender Substitutes

When you’re in a pinch and need to cook, you need an immersion blender for making soups, purees, sauces, dressings, and even hot oatmeal. But if you can’t afford one or just don’t have room in your kitchen for it right now — that’s okay! There are lots of different types of immersion blenders out there. So let’s take a look at the ones we recommend as the best substitutes when it comes to taking care of your mushy mise en place or getting rich creamy sauces and drinks.

You’ll find lots of interesting information on this post about what each type is good for most and why they’re so popular among chefs all over the world.

But first, let’s define what an immersion blender is.

What Is An Immersion Blender?

An immersion blender is a hand-held tool where you “immerse” the blender portion right into whatever it is you’re trying to blend. It’s used for chopping, pureeing, beating, and whipping all in one neat little package. You can use it to make all sorts of soups and sauces as well as smoothies and shakes. Because of its small size and versatility, it’s a great tool for restaurants or hotels who need to get things done fast and are short on space. It can replace a food processor making the job much more versatile with fewer tools to work with.

Immersion blenders were created thanks to the invention of electric motors in the late 19th century. At the time, there was nothing to blend food with because they hadn’t invented a machine that could shape food easily. The first immersion blender was invented by Edward DeCaro and patented in 1907. Since then, they’ve become quite popular as personal kitchen appliances and are now used by culinary artists all over the world for almost any job that requires blending food items into one another for sauces, drinks, or soups.

The best immersion blenders have an awesome power to weight ratio, which means that you don’t need a lot of effort to crush what you’re trying to blend together. A standard, medium sized immersion blender will crush ice as well as most fruits and vegetables with ease. They’re good for pureeing soups or sauces too. And they’re especially good for making raw baby food for babies or young children who can’t yet eat a full meal by themselves.

All these benefits make them so versatile! You can use them to make baby food in the comfort of your own kitchen and blend up smoothies and drinks to enjoy at home. Plus, you can whip up your favorite soups faster than you could if you had to use a regular food processor or blender.

But sometimes your immersion blender might go missing, or you might be in need of one on the fly for an unexpected party when all of your other kitchen equipment is in the shop for maintenance. And those are situations where it’s good to know what type of substitutes are available to you when you’re forced to cook with another type of immersion blender.

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So let’s take a look at the most common immersion blenders and their closest equivalents.

Types of Immersion Blenders

There are three different types of immersion blenders, and each one can do something that the others cannot do. The first type is called an angled blender or a stick blender. This one is perfect for whisking eggs, making baby food, and blending soups. They usually have a narrow bottom with a slightly flatter top which allows you to whisk eggs with ease and blend sauces right into your cooking pots! You can usually find these in Asian store like Linens n Things or Bed Bath & Beyond.

The next type is called a flat blade. This is the most common type of immersion blender and it can do whatever the other two types can do, but it also has an extra blade that allows you to crush ice or puree smoothies even more easily than the last ones. If you want one for making baby food or your own soups, this is recommended!

And finally, there’s the whisk attachment which allows you to do what the first two types could, but it does it slightly better than them. The whisk attachment has two blades instead of just one at a smaller angle for easier use and more versatility. If you’re making soups or baby foods, this is the perfect tool for you!

Immersion Blender Substitutes

Here are a few other hand-held tools you can use as substitutes for an immersion blender while you save up or wait to buy one. They aren’t as versatile as the first three types, but they’ll still get the job done. And, in a pinch, they’ll do whatever you need them to do until you can afford a real one.

Oster Beehive Blender – This is a personal sized blender that can blend yogurt and margaritas. It’s also good for making smoothies and milkshakes too. There’s even a cleaning brush that comes with it so you can clean the blades after you use it.

– This is a personal sized blender that can blend yogurt and margaritas. It’s also good for making smoothies and milkshakes too. There’s even a cleaning brush that comes with it so you can clean the blades after you use it. Kitchenaid Hand Blender – This is a small kitchen appliance that whips up smoothies and soups. You can also use it to blend the eggs in a bowl for your baby or to make your own baby food!

– This is a small kitchen appliance that whips up smoothies and soups. You can also use it to blend the eggs in a bowl for your baby or to make your own baby food! Cuisinart CJE-1000 – There are three different types of immersion blenders, but this one is called a stick blender. It’s designed for people who want to make their own smoothies, pesto, and even macaroni . You can find the Cuisinart CJE-1000 at Bed Bath & Beyond!

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– There are three different types of immersion blenders, but this one is called a stick blender. It’s designed for people who want to make their own smoothies, pesto, and even . You can find the Cuisinart CJE-1000 at Bed Bath & Beyond! Waring Pro MX1000 – Another personal sized stick blender, this one is good for making your own veggie shakes and green smoothies as well as juices from fresh produce. If you want to make your own homemade baby food or smoothies from home grown fruits and veggies, this is a great tool to have.

Immersion Blender Care and Maintenance

All hand-held immersion blenders are expensive, so you want to make sure that you properly look after them. Here are some simple tips for caring for it so that it will last for years to come.

Wipe down the exterior with a damp cloth after each use and rinse it before using again. This will ensure that any food residue is cleaned off. You can even put the appliance in the dishwasher if it’s getting a little dirty, but make sure that your dishwasher has a low heat setting on it or it will melt plastic parts and leave white stains on your dishwasher.

This will ensure that any food residue is cleaned off. You can even put the appliance in the dishwasher if it’s getting a little dirty, but make sure that your dishwasher has a low heat setting on it or it will melt plastic parts and leave white stains on your dishwasher. Don’t store the immersion blender with dry ingredients in it. It takes longer for dry ingredients to soften than liquid ingredients, so if you want to use something like an extra blender blade or whisk to help blend up these ingredients they need to be freshly made. If you have any dry ingredients already in the blender, take them out before mixing any new ones.

It takes longer for dry ingredients to soften than liquid ingredients, so if you want to use something like an extra blender blade or whisk to help blend up these ingredients they need to be freshly made. If you have any dry ingredients already in the blender, take them out before mixing any new ones. Be sure that your immersion blender has a cover on it when it’s not being used.

Can you use a hand mixer instead of an immersion blender for soup?

Yes! Just as you would use a hand mixer for blended soups, you can use it to blend up things like dips, baby food, and sauces just as easily. It’s easier to use than an immersion blender because you can just leave it in the bowl and walk away while it blends up whatever you need.

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How do I get my immersion blender to spin when it’s not plugged in?

Remember all those old fashioned blenders with the big ball on top that spins? That’s what this is. Just give the handle a couple of turns while your blender is sitting in the bowl and then release it. The ball should begin spinning on its own, though you’ll have to give it a little push at first just like the old fashioned ones did so that the blades can get started.

Why is the blender whisk attachment so much more expensive than the other attachments?

The whisk attachment is more expensive because it’s meant for pureeing soups and baby foods. It’s made from stainless steel to make sure that the blades stay sharp and that they don’t rust over time. It also comes with it’s own cover so that it doesn’t get dirty while being stored away.

How do you use a hand mixer for soup?

You can use a hand mixer for soup the same way that you would use it to beat cream, eggs, or make mayonnaise. Just put it into a mixing bowl and attach the wires to your hand mixer. Then turn your hand mixer on and let it run while you walk away!

Can I use my immersion blender instead of my food processor?

Imersion blenders are a lot better at pureeing things than food processors because they’ll work harder at them. Food processors will usually struggle when trying to puree applesauce, but if you put that in an immersion blender with some cinnamon and other spices added in, the blade will turn until it’s nice and smooth.

How do I puree soup with a hand blender?

You can puree soup the same way that you would use a regular blender, but it’s easier to do with an immersion blender. Just make sure that your soup is hot when you start so that it liquefies right away and you don’t have to worry about reheating it later.

How much should I spend on a hand blender?

There are hand blenders that cost less than $15, but they won’t be as powerful as a more expensive model. For most people, $50 is plenty to spend on one of these appliances if their budget is limited.

Conclusion:

The best immersion blender feels solid, is easy to use, and will last you a long time. You can also get a hand mixer attachment that’s compatible with your home brew system. If you have a large family or host company often, you might want to consider buying an extra hand blender so that you have one on hand when the other is in use. All of these blenders are some of the best that I’ve been able to find. They’re all popular, inexpensive, and easy to use.