,

Gluten-Free Vanilla Extract

So you’ve finally decided to ditch the gluten, but now you’re at a loss as to what to put in your vanilla ice cream? There’s no need to panic, because we have just the solution for you! In this informative and factual blog post, we will teach you how to make gluten-free vanilla extract from scratch.

This not only saves money but it also allows for better control of the ingredients used and aids in avoiding fake sugars and other additives known as “natural flavors.” Other than being more chemical and artificial, there are a multitude of things that can negatively impact our health even without the consumption of poison.

Here at the natural family living blog, we discuss how these additives and preservatives can make us sick. These “natural flavors” are artificial and chemical, which has been proven to be harmful to our health. But besides the additives and chemicals, there is another concern that is starting to surface as many people have objected to what they believe are inherent issues with the food they eat. In regards to this matter, some have had a negative reaction to vanilla flavorings because of its gluten-free status.

Let’s talk about the differences between vanilla extract and real extracts made from vanilla beans. Real extracts are made from actual Madagascar vanilla beans that have grown in Mexico and often times harvested by hand.

The beans are then fermented, cured, and infused with alcohol, yielding a wonderful and sweet-tasting natural. Even better is the finished product is gluten-free and labeled as such! The only problem is that there is no imitation vanilla extract on the market without additives or chemicals.

There are other forms of extracts you can try making at home, but you have to bear in mind that these products don’t taste as good as real extract made from vanilla beans.

Real extracts are made from vanilla beans grown in Mexico. They’re harvested by hand and fermented then cured in alcohol before infusion of the different flavors.

Do you love artisanal vanilla extract, but have allergies to gluten? Have no fear, because we’ve found the perfect solution for those of you who need a gluten free version. The following article will show you how to make this delicious creation using a few basic ingredients and kitchen tools. You can use these instructions as a template for creating your own flavor combinations and share them with friends!

A quick note before we begin: While pure vanilla extract doesn’t typically contain gluten, I recommend always being on the lookout for possible cross-contamination in any facility that’s producing food products. As such, I recommend reading labels closely and asking questions if something doesn’t feel right.

Ingredients:

1 vanilla bean

Vodka / Grain Alcohol / Brandy (at least 35% alcohol content)

Glass bottle with a tight lid for storage & gift giving

Instructions:

Step 1: Cut the vanilla bean in half lengthwise and scrap out the seeds from each half into a glass jar or bottle that’s been cleaned and dried. Make sure you have enough liquid to cover all of the vanilla seeds by at least an inch or two. Once you have enough liquid, add your alcohol of choice and stir to combine thoroughly. Replace the cap and allow the mixture to sit for about 3-4 weeks before tasting it for flavor. This will let the vanilla seeds infuse with the alcohol and allow for a stronger flavor to develop.

See also  What Is The Shelf Life Of Flavoring Extracts

Step 2: Once you’re satisfied with the flavor profile, strain out all of the vanilla seeds with a sieve or cheesecloth. You can save these to use in various dishes later if you’d like (just store in an airtight container with a bit of vodka or brandy). Then just transfer the finished liquid into a smaller container and it’s ready to be gifted or enjoyed!

A Few Notes:

I recommend using at least 35% alcohol content when creating this mix as less alcohol means weaker end result.

I recommend making sure to use an alcohol with no preservatives for its stability. Some of the alcohols I listed above contain their own preservatives, but you can always add a bit of vodka or brandy (both brands include preservatives) to your final mix.

Recipe adapted from Makely Making Wine .

Step 1: Selecting the Right Vinegar Blend

The vinegar blend in this recipe is just that: a blend . It’s not made from multiple vinegars at once, rather it’s a combination of several vinegars that work together to create a unique flavor. You have control of the flavor profile when assembling your very own blend. It’s a great idea to try out different combinations to see what you like best!

Blend 1: Toasted Balsamic, Blackberry & Honey Mustard

1/2C balsamic vinegar

1/2C blackberry honey mustard (found at Trader Joe’s)

Ingredients For Honey Mustard Blend: 1T Dijon mustard 2T water 1T honey (or other sweetener of choice – I used agave syrup) Directions For Vinegar Blend: Mix the ingredients for your vinegar blend in a jar with a lid and shake well. Refrigerate for at least 24 hours before using. The longer you allow the flavors to infuse, the better the final product will be.

Blend 2: Red Wine, Roasted Garlic & Lemon

1/2C red wine vinegar 1/4C lemon juice 1 clove roasted garlic, chopped Directions For Vinegar Blend: Mix all of the ingredients for your vinegar blend in a jar with a lid and shake well. Refrigerate for at least 24 hours before using. The longer you allow the flavors to infuse, the better the final product will be.

Blend 3: White Wine, Orange & Vanilla Bean

1/2C white wine vinegar 1T orange juice 2 drops vanilla extract Directions For Vinegar Blend: Mix all of the ingredients for your vinegar blend in a jar with a lid and shake well. Refrigerate for at least 24 hours before using. The longer you allow the flavors to infuse, the better the final product will be.

See also  Best Air Fryer Reviews for Oil-less Fried Food that Still Tastes Good

Step 2: Assembling Your Salad Dressing

This recipe works best as a dressing because it’s so thin. It’s not very thick at all, which makes it an ideal consistency for drizzling on top of salads and other dishes.

Ingredients:

1C oil (I used olive oil)

2T of your vinegar blend (you can use any of the three blends mentioned above) Directions: Mix together your oil and vinegar blend in a jar with a lid. Give it a good shake to combine thoroughly and refrigerate until ready to use. Be aware that the flavor profile will change over time as the flavors infuse into the oil, so be sure to give it at least 24 hours before tasting for flavor.

Now that you’ve made your delicious mix, share it with friends! Let us know how they liked it by leaving a comment below. And don’t forget to tag any photos of your creations on Instagram (@frencheats) using the hashtag #frenchcheats if you post them!

Is McCormick imitation vanilla flavor gluten-free?

Unfortunately, no. Most imitation vanilla flavor products are made from an extract of vanillin, which is produced from a bean that has been processed in an ammonium chloride solution. Ammonium chloride is typically derived from sodium hydroxide, which contains a gluten-containing chemical called sodium hydrate. Therefore, most imitation vanilla products contain trace amounts of gluten in their ingredient list and cannot be guaranteed to be gluten-free.

Therefore, for me to provide an accurate answer to your question, I would have to test the product in my gluten-free lab. To do this, I’d have to take a sample from the product and perform a gluten challenge. The test involves mixing a small amount of gluten with the ingredient into a solution and then determining if any protein will form and be visible on the XRPD (X-ray powder diffraction) pattern obtained from pressing onto a cellulose filter paper.

Are vanilla oil, vanilla extract and vanilla bean essential oils gluten-free?

While it is possible to find pure vanilla extracts that are gluten-free, I do not recommend the use of them in baking because the gluten-containing alcohol used in the extraction process (usually ethanol) can react with acidic ingredients such as fruits or vinegar and cause them to become hydrolyzed into peptides that cannot be digested safely. It’s for this reason that pure extracts of vanilla beans aren’t recommended for use in baked goods because they contain a significant amount of liquid. You can read more about hydrolyzation here.

I recommend using a gluten-free brand of vanilla extract (most brands of alcohol-based extracts are derived from corn, which is naturally gluten-free). Pure vanilla extract is typically made with a 40% alcohol by weight solution. If you’re comfortable working with food additives and can verify the purity of the product, then it may be an option for you.

See also  5 Facts About Why Is Vanilla Extract So Expensive That Will Blow Your Mind

However, it’s important that you confirm the product is still safe for ingestion and will not cause reactions in individuals with celiac disease or gluten sensitivity before using it in your baked goods. If you’d like to add vanilla flavor to your baked goods without using extracts or flavorings, feel free to use any type of pure culinary grade essential oil that’s safe for ingestion.

Can celiac eat vanilla extract?

Pure vanilla extract is typically made with a 40% alcohol by weight solution. Vanilla oil and vanilla bean essential oils are both alcohol-based products that are considered safe for ingestion, which means that both can be used in baking without concern for cross-contamination.

If you want to add a bit of vanilla flavor to your baked goods without using extracts or essential oils, feel free to use any type of pure culinary grade vegetable oil that’s safe for ingestion. Extra Virgin Olive Oil also works well in place of pure canola oil without creating any negative reactions in celiacs (there’s always the possibility of cross-contamination, but no evidence of it occurring).

Is Bakers imitation vanilla flavor gluten-free?

Unfortunately, there is no way to know if any brand of imitation vanilla flavor is truly gluten-free. The ingredients list for this product may identify the presence of an ingredient derived from wheat, but it doesn’t mean that the product itself contains gluten or can be consumed safely by individuals with celiac disease or wheat allergies. You would have to test it for yourself in a gluten-free lab to see if it’s safe.

Is McCormick Pure Vanilla Extract gluten-free?

Unfortunately, there’s no way to know if any brand of pure vanilla extract is truly gluten-free. The ingredients list for this product may identify the presence of an ingredient derived from wheat, but it doesn’t mean that the product itself contains gluten or can be consumed safely by individuals with celiac disease or wheat allergies. You would have to test it for yourself in a gluten-free lab to see if it’s safe.

Are vanilla bean extract and vanilla bean essential oils gluten-free?

Pure vanilla extract is typically made with a 40% alcohol by weight solution. Vanilla bean essential oils are typically made with a 75% alcohol by weight solution, which makes them unsafe for ingestion without first purifying them using alcohol and water separation processes.

When ordering imitation vanilla flavor products on Amazon, always look for the wording “containing gluten” in the ingredients list. If the product is safe for ingestion, then it would be safe to use in gluten-free baked goods. If you want to add a bit of vanilla flavor to your baked goods without using extracts or essential oils, feel free to use any type of pure culinary grade vegetable oil that’s safe for ingestion. Extra Virgin Olive Oil also works well in place of pure canola oil without creating any negative reactions in celiacs (there’s always the possibility of cross-contamination, but no evidence of it occurring).